Law Students

Indiana Tech Law School and Charleston School of Law Proving Legal Education is Disastrous
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There are two law schools making headlines right now that are sending the message that a legal education is a disaster, according to Business Insider.

Indiana Tech Law School opened its doors in 2013 with just 28 first-year students, which was below the target of 100. And, for some reason, the school felt that Indiana needed a fifth law school even though law graduates were having trouble finding full-time jobs.

  
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Just less than one month ago, the first dean and university provost, Peter Alexander, resigned from both of his positions. In a press release, the school said “Alexander cited the achievement of the goals he had established for the law school to that point in time and a desire to pursue other employment opportunities as the reasons for his decision to resign.”

To make matters worse, the school has the following posted on its website:

“Like any new law school, Indiana Tech must be in operation for one year prior to seeking ABA accreditation…The Law School makes no representation to any applicant that it will be approved by the American Bar Association prior to the graduation of any matriculating student.”

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The second school, The Charleston School of Law, is a for-profit law school. InfiLaw has been trying to acquire the law school since summer of 2013, but recently dropped its application for a license to operate the school.

The website for the law school states the following:



“Most students will depend on federal student loans to pay for tuition, books and living expenses while in law school. During the 2012-2013 academic year, 88% of our students borrowed student loans to finance their legal education. At graduation, the average student loan debt incurred for those borrowers while attending the Charleston School of Law was $146,595.”

Fifty-three percent of the class of 2013 from Charleston School of Law found full-time jobs that required a J.D. nine months after graduation.

 

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