B612 Foundation Says More Asteroids Have Hit Earth Than First Thought
B612 Foundation Says More Asteroids Have Hit Earth Than First Thought
Ice on Great Lakes Could Leave Lasting Problems
Ice on Great Lakes Could Leave Lasting Problems
Possibility of New Moon Forming in Saturn’s Rings
Possibility of New Moon Forming in Saturn’s Rings
Google Glass Available for Purchase Today
Google Glass Available for Purchase Today
Job Listings

Clovis People are Ancestors to Native Americans DNA Studies Show

 

 

A toddler that was buried 12,600 years ago in the southwestern part of Montana, had it’s remains tested and the DNA proves that, prehistoric Clovis People are the ancestors of American Indians, researchers said.

 



Get JD Journal in Your Mail
Subscribe to our FREE daily news alerts and get the latest updates on the most happening events in the legal, business, and celebrity world. You also get your daily dose of humor and entertainment!!


According to the journal, Nature, indigenous people in North and South America are 80 percent direct descendants of the child. The remaining 20 percent are related to the Clovis people as much as any other people on earth. For decades scientists believed that the Clovis people were European who used similar tools between 17,000 and 21,000 years ago.

 

Jennifer Raff, a research fellow in anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin said, Today’s finding shows this notion “can no longer be treated as a credible alternative Clovis (or Native American) origins.”

 

The study showed that the native Clovis people were the first native people to secure themselves in the Americas, but they weren’t the first people on the continent. According to scientists, about 25,000 years ago, people started to arrive in America by way of a Siberian land bridge in the last ice age and the Clovis people began to emanate. They did not descend from Europeans, Asians, or Melanesians.

 

The mitochondrial DNA from the boy, inherited from his mother, belongs to one of the “founder” lineages carried by people crossing from Siberia. This sequence is very rare and is in present American Indians. His genome showed he is closely related to American Indians and more related to Siberians than Eurasian.

 

The study involved Montana tribes as consultants in the study. Native communities had a mistrust of archaeologists and anthropologists in the past but the effort to include them in the findings is a good way to bridge a new relationship between Native Americans and scientists. The local tribes were told of the discoveries and scientists consulted with the them to know how best to continue their research. The boy will be buried exactly where he was found in late spring or early summer.

 

Image Credit: Ancient-tides.com

Did you like this? Share it:
Clovis People are Ancestors to Native Americans DNA Studies Show by

Tagged:

Jaan Posted by on February 20, 2014. Filed under Tech & Science News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.
  • Jennifer Raff

    There are numerous factual errors in this article. The journalist and readers should be aware that the statement “For decades scientists believed that the Clovis people were European who used similar tools between 17,000 and 21,000 years ago” is incorrect. Archaeologists and geneticists have long believed that the Clovis people–and indeed all Native Americans–are descended from ancient Siberian ancestors via a migration through Beringia. The genome from the Clovis child confirms this model.

    Similarly, this statement “indigenous people in North and South America are 80 percent direct descendants of the child. The remaining 20 percent are related to the Clovis people as much as any other people on earth” is inaccurate.
    Indigenous peoples of North and South American cannot be descendents of the Clovis child, as he died long before he was capable of reproduction. Moreover, those ancestry percentages are meaningless. It is more accurate to say that all Native Americans–including the population to which this child belonged–share a common ancestry, as I mentioned above.

    Finally, I question the use of the image at the top of the screen. What is it intending to depict? It has no relationship to any of the findings of this paper. It seems to have been chosen to evoke the idea of “generic savage cavemen” associated with the Clovis culture. I hope that readers can understand why that is incredibly problematic.

    I could list many other errors in this article, but instead I will conclude by seriously suggesting that more care be taken in writing articles like this in the future. Perhaps a good place to start would be actually talking to the people you quote instead of pulling statements from their papers. I would have been happy to talk you through the science of this research, had you reached out to me.